NCEJN Congratulates the Concerned Citizens of West Badin Community

Badin LakeOn Thursday, September 12th, 2013, community members in Badin, North Carolina met to form the Concerned Citizens of West Badin Community (“CCWBC”).  West Badin is an African-American community near Badin Lake in Stanly County.  Members of the newly formed group have been gathering informally to discuss ongoing issues related to pollution of the lake and the land nearby from the now shuttered Alcoa aluminum smelting facility in Badin.  The facility contaminated the lake with PCBs, putting the health of those who eat fish out of the lake at risk. Because of the heightened concentrations of PCBs in these fish, a consumption advisory was issued in February of 2009, and remains in effect as of today. So far, the state has only required that Alcoa cover up the PCB contaminated sediment in the lake bed.  There is still on-site contamination, and no certainty concerning if it will all be cleaned up.

Over the last year, NCEJN has advocated with and on behalf of the West Badin community regarding clean-up of Alcoa’s contamination. The NCEJN is excited to congratulate CCWBC on their formal organization and provide additional support as it advocates for the West Badin community. Taking a stand for community-wide healthy land and clean water is no small task.  The work of CCWBC is significant for all those residents and visitors who enjoy Badin Lake for fishing, boating and swimming.

Macy Hinson and Eric Jackson are the CCWBC co-chairs and the communications chairperson is Mae Teal, maeteal@yahoo.com. Concerned Citizens of West Badin Community meetings will be held every second Thursday of the month at 6:30pm. Read more about some of the Badin Lake/Alcoa-Clean up issues through the comments submitted to NC state agencies at Badin Lake Clean-Up.

Communications Chairperson Mae Teal, maeteal@yahoo.com, will send out communications for the meetings. Contact Mae to be added to the address list.

Ecuador to Begin Drilling in Yasuni National Park

Last month the Ecuadorian government abandoned its attempt to establish a trust to keep from drilling for oil in the Yasuni National Park. The trust sought the sizable sum of 3.6 billion dollars from oil-dependent international governments. As compensation, nations would have the satisfaction of knowing the nearly 4,000 square miles of forested land would remain a protected ecosystem. In essence, President Raphael Correa was asking the world to pay the country not to drill for oil in the Amazonian Rain Forest. The government mustered $13 million, a fraction of the desired amount. Last month President Correa, declared the international community “failed” Ecuador. However, it appears the Ecuadorian government’s plan was one made to fail. For decades, Ecuador has boasts a heavily oil-based economy, in spite of an unresolved legal suit against Chevron stemming from past contamination. Currently, Ecuador is the fifth largest producer in Latin America with most of its oil being sold to the United States. President Correa’s decision to drill in Yasuni National Park seems to be another case of a government expanding its economic interests at the expense of its populace and its ecology. All the while, environments, be they frack-fearing communities in Central North Carolina or those thousands of miles south in the most diverse ecosystem on the planet remain subject to the economic and ecological exploitations of nations dependent upon fossil fuels, of which the United States is a chief culprit. NCEJN remains dedicated to working against threats to the environment and vulnerable communities, be they local or global.

Fred Tutman to make keynote address at the NCEJN Summit

Fred Tutman

Tutman to speak at NCEJN’s 15th Annual Summit.

Fred Tutman, the Patuxent Riverkeeper, and the only African-American Riverkeeper, will give the keynote address at this year’s North Carolina Environmental Justice Summit.  The  15th Annual Summit will take place on October 18th and 19th  at the Franklinton  Center at Bricks.  You can access registration documents on this site.  Find out more about Fred Tutman here.

Gary Grant, NCEJN & Peggy Shepard, WEACT in NYC – 2013

Gary Grant, NCEJN Executive Director and Peggy Shepard, WEACT for Environmental Justice Executive Director in New York City, August 2013

Gary Grant, NCEJN Executive Director and Peggy Shepard, WEACT for Environmental Justice Executive Director in New York City, August 2013

While in New York City on August 6-9, 2013 to attend and present at the Rural Sociological Society’s (RSS) annual meeting addressing the issues and the plight of Black, Native, Latino, and Women farmers and food security, Gary Grant, Executive Director of NCEJN, Willie J. Wright (NCEJN), and Dr. Spencer Wood (Kansas State University) met with Peggy Shephard and the WE ACT team on Wednesday August 7th, 2013 . The Harlem-based WE ACT addresses various forms of environmental injustice and degradation, from clean air to healthy indoor environments. The meeting helped NCEJN solidify our cross-regional relationship with our “city cousins” to the North and provided a space to share some struggles, strategies, and successes of communities in North Carolina and New York. As many know, here in North Carolina we are faced with the future proliferation of industrial hog lagoons (cess pools), landfills, and fracking operations which disproportionately affect poor communities and those of color. In New York, WE ACT is working to address issues of air, water, and indoor pollution and concerns of food safety and sovereignty. NCEJN hopes to work directly with WE ACT in the future in order to engage and influence each others’ communities.

SB328: NC landfill bill would send us back to dumping on the poor

http://www.newsobserver.com/2013/06/25/2988998/nc-landfill-bill-would-send-us.html

News & Observer

Published: June 25, 2013

Welcome to the new & improved NCEJN website!

The Home page is where you will find all of the NC Environmental Justice Network’s recent blog postings on upcoming events, important dates/notices, and all the need-to-know information on Environmental Justice issues in North Carolina.

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~NCEJN